Articles Tagged with Reverse Mortgage

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Reverse mortgages can be a great financial tool for retirees or others living on a fixed income. A reverse mortgage can be used to pay off an existing home loan, gain freedom from a house payment and/or provide a retirement income source. The homeowner must still pay real estate taxes and homeowner’s insurance but otherwise no payments are due on a reverse mortgage until the borrower spouses both die. Then the loan comes all due and must be paid in full by refinancing, the use of other estate assets or by a sale of the home.

But what happens when the reverse mortgage is taken out by only one spouse?   If the surviving spouse is not also a borrower, he or she may need to sell or refinance the house when the borrower spouse dies. Refinancing is not usually an option for a surviving spouse so the family home would need to be sold at, perhaps, the worst possible time.   At least that was the situation until the advent of an FHA program called Mortgagee Optional Election (MOE).

The MOE program can enable a surviving spouse who was not a reverse mortgage borrower to remain in the family home after the borrowing spouse dies.   But inclusion in this program is not automatic. The surviving spouse needs to contact the mortgage servicer to request an MOE assignment. Certain conditions also apply:

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A reverse mortgage is a financial device where borrowers can receive money based off the amount of equity they have in their home. Reverse mortgages offer a tool for senior citizens to supplement their retirement income. To be eligible for a reverse mortgage, a borrower must be at least 62 years of age. There are also restrictions regarding the residence. To name a few: it must be the borrowers’ primary residence, it must be in good condition, it must be paid off or almost paid off and it must be a single family home.

Unlike a traditional mortgage, a borrower in a reverse mortgage receives payments instead of making monthly payments back to the lender. This is true as long as the borrower lives in the home. Payments from a reverse mortgage can be in the form of one-time upfront payments or in monthly payments to the borrower. The borrower is however, still responsible for HOA fees, property taxes and insurance on the home. The balance of the loan becomes due once the home is sold or the borrower passes away.

Reverse mortgages are an alternative means to tapping the equity a borrower has in their home. More conventional options include selling the home, refinancing or taking out a home equity line of credit. However, these options may not be available or suitable if the borrower does not wish to move or is otherwise not qualified to obtain additional financing.